Wednesday, 5 April 2017

An All New Renault Clio


The latest Renault Clio is not to be trifled with. The Fourth generation Renault Clio has been revamped with new engines, some design changes and a wide range of new creature comforts. Other hatchback manufacturers should be cautious as this car might just take South Africa’s favourite hatchback title in 2016. There is also a new Renault Clio GT line that has been introduced this year. This model aims to make a sporty Clio that won’t cost you as much as the RenaultSport but it will give you a better driving experience.




The inside is seductively French

Inside the Clio is a much improved cabin that oozes French flair. You are met with black gloss upholstery and soft finishes. An aeroplane wing design has been used for the dashboard which has very accessible panels, a new digital speedometer and adjustable steering columns and head rests.
You will get a host of convenience like cup holders and door storage panels. There’s a 1/3-2/3 splitfold bench in every Clio and a category leading boot capacity of 300dm³.
There are three normal trim levels which have been named Authentique, Expression and Dynamique. Renault Clio has also introduced a new Renault Clio GT line which we will discuss later in the article.
The standard trim level is the Authentique trim. All classes have what this trim level has which include electronic stability control (ESC), anti-lock brakes, hill-start assistance, cruise control, AUX ports with Bluetooth and USB ports too.
The Expression has a Clio 18cm Touch screen with a special multimedia system that makes use of satellite navigation, USB, Bluetooth and allows for audio streaming. The Expression comes with fog lights, sixteen inch alloy wheels, leather on the interior gear shift and gear lever.
The top end Clio model, the Dynamique, comes with a wide range of handy features like a hands free keycard, power windows, light sensors and auto rain sensors. There are seventeen inch alloys with black/chrome interior and exterior styling. As optional extras, you can get auto climate control, rear parking sensors and a fixed sunroof.

The outside is dripping with flair

The Renault Clio is only available in a five door configuration. The gorgeous body is wider, longer and has a much longer wheel base than the Clio predecessors. The handles on the doors are integrated into the panels themselves and the very small rear quarter windows melt seamlessly into the sleek look of the new Renault Clio. The car has a very shapely profile with chrome trim on the grille and stylish front and rear bumpers.

The purr of the new Renault Clio

Renault has started downsizing its engine line up. The Renault Clio has a 55kW, 1.2, sixteen valve, turbo engine under its hood. This might now sound like a lot of power but if you look into the technology that has been used here, you won’t be lacking any acceleration.
When you actually drive the car, you won’t feel like you are driving a 1.2 engine. In fact the new Clio feels more powerful than the old one, even though the engine is smaller. 55kW of power will produce 107 Nm of torque with a very impressive fuel consumption of just 5.5 litre per 100 kilometres and a 0 to 100 kilometre per hour in just 15.4 seconds. Your top speed is a healthy 167 kilometre per hour.
Then you also have a choice of two other engine variants, the 66kW Turbo and the 88kW Turbo EDC. The 66kW Turbo has a top speed of 182 Km per hour and a 0-100 km/h time of 12.2 seconds. The 88kW Turbo EDC has a top speed of 199 kilometres per hour and this engine variant will get you from standing still to 100 kilometres per hour in just 9.4 seconds.

Safety in the Renault Clio for sale

The Clio has a five star rating and a Euro Ncap best-in-class status. All Clio’s have ESP, ASR traction control, ABS, EBD and EBA. The steering wheel is electronically varied and there is a speed limited cruise control function.
The Clio has two airbags in the front and two in the back with pre-tensioned seatbelts and load limiters.

Renault Clio Blaze Limited Edition

The Blaze is a limited edition form of the new Renault Clio. The Blaze features colour coded mirrors with LED driving lights and fancy Blaze badges on the vehicle. The engine is the same 66kW Turbo Petrol Engine and the interior gets the same colour coded treatment as the outside of the car. The steering wheel, air vents, door panels and gear gaiter are all colour coded.
In terms of technology, the Blaze comes with new Renault Bass Reflex® sound system which has acoustic nozzles and indoor integrated speakers and a massive 30 litre sub-woofer. You will also get the MediaNav® Just Touch system which is Renault’s onboard touch screen tablet that operates as navigation, radio, Bluetooth integration and a telephone.

Renault Clio GT line

As we mentioned before, the Clio GT is for those who want more from their Clio but aren’t willing to fork out the cash for a RenaultSport.
So what’s the difference between the GT and the regular Clio? Let’s start with the dazzling GT blur paint that comes with the Clio GT and the stunning seventeen inch rims with a much more aggressive looking front end bumper. The GT has its LED lights closer to the bottom edge of the car, the GT gets a rear diffuser and there is a shiny chrome tip on the exhausts. Lastly, you will find scuff plates and the body kit from the RenaultSport. This particular Turbo Petrol Engine claims to be the best compromise between driving enjoyment and fuel economy on the market.
In terms of more performance, the engine has been tweaked a bit. There isn’t much of a speed change but the economy tweaks are very evident. The engine has been given an over boost function which increases the performance in the 2nd and third gears but 4 extra kW and 15Nm of extra torque. This results in a 40 second drop in 0 to 100 kilometres per hour from the standard Renault Clio.
Feature wise the Renault Clio GT line is jam packed. Very few cars in the same class as the GT can even come close to the price you pay for the features you get. The GT has all of the things you would expect from a top end sports car; there’s a speed limiter, cruise control, satellite navigation. Auto wipers that have rain sensors, an infotainment system with touchscreen functionality, and head lights that also have sensors to detect if its dark or not, hands free car access and starter. Then you get all the same safety features that the regular Clio has like EBD, ASC, ABS and airbags.
Feel true French flair in a new Renault Clio and make a bold impression wherever you go. Experience the wide range of features that have been loaded into the Renault Clio. If the Clio isn’t enough for you then have a look at a Renault Clio Blaze or the Renault Clio GT line. Browse through Group 1 Renault Dealership Johannesburg’s extensive collection of online vehicles and find a Renault Clio today.
Article source: http://blog.automart.co.za/2016/03/15/an-all-new-renault-clio/

Thursday, 26 January 2017

10 Things You Should Know About the Renault Kwid

Renault India knew it had to pull a miracle out of its hat if it were to convince people of their seriousness in making a dent in the entry-level compact car segment. Called the Kwid, they managed to do just that, announcing to the world that the smallest baby in their model portfolio pulled punches above its class. We’ve drawn up a list of 10 things you should know about the Renault Kwid, to show you just how distinctive this car is:
10 things you should know about the renault kwid
10 things you should know about the Renault Kwid
1. The Renault Kwid looks like no other small-car in the history of the Indian automobile. Butch, SUV-esque styling giving it a larger-than-life presence that other cars, many classes above would kill for.
2. The car is built on the CMF-A platform that Renault have developed in conjunction with their Japanese partner, Nissan. The Kwid is the first car to benefit from the platform in India and ushers in a new era in car-building for the manufacturer.
3. Renault have been aggressive on the localization front with the Kwid. This was done with the aim of keeping costs low, translating into the car’s low sticker price that undercuts the competition by a comfortable margin.
4. The Renault Kwid’s mileage is an astounding 25.17 km/l as per ARAI certification. This makes it the most powerful car in the segment, besting the likes of Maruti’s Alto800 and even the Tata Nano.
5. Renault will be launching both, a larger, more powerful 1 litre engine as well as an AMT variant for the Kwid in the coming years.
6. The Renault Kwid’s mileage is not the only thing that’s better than the competition. The car is longer, wider and larger than all other offerings in the segment.
7. Frugal engineering features high on the 10 things you should know about the Renault Kwid. From using three wheel bolts, to a single wiper, the manufacturer has focussed heavily on cost and weight savings. Even the fasteners are lower in number, while plastic has been used extensively to achieve targets.
8. The Renault Kwid has delivered a telling blow with its pricing. With an on-road price that’s a good INR 50,000 lower than the comparable competition, it makes for a compelling buy.
9. The Kwid also has the highest ground clearance in its class, almost putting larger crossovers and even some SUV’s to shame in this department.
10. The Renault Kwid’s interiors are unparalleled, both in terms of the features offered (7-inch touchscreen infotainment system or the long accessories list) as well as sheer space in the boot & the passenger cabin.
All-in-all, the car is a delight on multiple fronts, making it a compelling-buy for someone contemplating a purchase in the segment. To find out more, find a reputable Renault dealership in your area, such as Group 1 Renault.

Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Renault Captur Review

by Craig Duff · CarsGuide




What we like

  • Good value
  • Secure roadholding and one of the better steering feels in the class
  • Looks will grab attention

What we don't

  • No rear side airbags
  • Two-tone paintjob is significantly more expensive on the Expression


It's all about the look with the Renault Captur, from the optional two-tone exterior styling to the dimpled surfaces, coloured zippers and bright plastic highlights in the cabin.
But there's a method behind the interior-designer madness.
The surfaces will be easy to wipe down, which will endear them to parents with young kids and 20-somethings who tend to live in their vehicles on weekends away. The same applies to the zip-off cushion covers standard in the top-end Dynamique and a $600 option for the Expression.


While the looks will grab the most attention, it's the underpinnings of the Renault that will appeal to diehards used to the brand's hot hatches.


The stiffened suspension definitely puts it at the sporty end of the light SUV brigade. The occasionally jumpy ride is compensated for by secure roadholding and one of the better steering feels in the class. Unfortunately the pace, in either 900cc turbo three-cylinder manual guise or 1.2L turbo four-cylinder auto guise, is at the more moderate end of the scale.


The Captur is destined to be a hit in the same way as the Clio light car it is based on. This baby SUV is a smart mix of stylish looks and decent standard features that justify adding it to the list when shopping for a high-riding crossover.


VALUE


The pricing lands the Captur in the heart of an increasingly competitive segment.


Standard gear includes a seven-inch touchscreen with satnav and a reversing camera, auto lights and wipers, keyless entry and a sliding rear bench seat that can mix and match rear legroom with cargo capacity. With the seats in their most forward position, cargo space is a very impressive 445 litres.


The next step up gets the same interior features but with a six-speed twin-clutch automatic matched to a 1.2-litre four-cylinder.


The Dynamique tops the rangewith a standard two-tone paintjob that's aoption on the Expression, along with fog lights with a cornering function, 17-inch alloy rims and the washable zip-off seat covers.


There are, however, two notable omissions: the Captur doesn't have rear side airbags. Altough, it still gets five stars from the official ANCAP testing regime.


DRIVING


The Captur rides 163mm off the ground and its hip point — the level of the seat squab — is 100mm higher than in a Clio. That makes it easier to get in and out and the doors open wide enough to allow that.


The in-car entertainment is handled by a seven-inch touchscreen with satnav. The graphics are functional if not first rate.There's an enhanced R-Link infotainment system with upgraded sound system for a bit extra, a choice of wheel colours, orange/green/blue interior trim accents and a range of decals. Personalisation is a trend brands are looking to leverage.


Carsguide's first experience is in the triple-cylinder with a five-speed manual box. The sliding rear bench seat means four adults can squeeze into the Renault without needing to dislocate limbs. The back seat position is upright and the pews are flat but the essentials, head, leg and shoulder room, are all catered for.


The ride itself is choppy at urban pace over sharp-ridged bumps and expansion joints, especially in the back where the torsion beam rear end can crash over hits. It handles faster, open roads with shallower ruts with far more decorum.


Momentum has to be maintained on the 0.9L model by regular applications of the gearshift. It's a light throw and the five forward ratios are well spaced to match the rorty, snarly nature of the engine, which effectively winds out of puff at 5000rpm.


Acceleration is acceptable and it rolls easily along the freeway at 110km/h, though overtaking moves would need to be well planned.


The 1.2L is just on a second quicker to 100km/h and feels it both off the mark and during in-gear acceleration. The six-speed dual-clutch auto hesitates off the mark and isn't as crisp on the changes as more advanced models.


It does help keep fuel use down to 5.4L/100km, though on a hard test we saw mid-sevens on both engines.


VERDICT


Differences in design and layout should capture fans for this mini SUV. It has the price, packaging and high-riding position to earn a slice of the fastest growing segment in town.


2015 Renault Captur


Engines: 0.9L turbo three-cylinder, 66kW/135Nm; 1.2L turbo four-cylinder, 88kW/190Nm


Transmissions: 5-speed manual, 6-speed twin-clutch auto


Thirst: 4.9L/100km; 5.4L/100km


Dimensions: 4122mm (L), 1778mm (W) 1566mm (H)


Weight: 1100-1180kg


Spare: Spacesaver


Convinced to get your own? Contact Group 1 Renault and ask about the Renault Captur Price today.


Monday, 4 July 2016

Renault Sandero Motoring Review


Everything Renault launches of late seems to turn to gold. The new Clio is a great example and the recently launched Duster is even better. But the French brand has now turned its eyes to the entry-level market and replaced the Sandero with a completely new offering. And what an offering it is.


On the menu of this new French cuisine is a host of new upgrades and a lot of best-in-class features. Built on the same platform as the Clio, the Sandero hatch combines little ‘big car’ portions with the latest in engine technologies to offer the South African motoring public a product that is hard to ignore.


While the previous-generation Sandero may have had a few hiccups and a rather dull design, this new beauty regains some of the elegance the brand is renowned for.


Combining youthful and modern styling, it certainly looks the part in a segment that offers aging stock. But the Sandero’s centrepiece diamond-shaped badge gracing the front of the bonnet and dominating the black grille complements its fresh façade.The integrated roof spoiler and body coloured side mirrors along with the 15-inch alloy wheels (standard on the Dynamique) hint at a sporty undertone.


But probably where the biggest technological jump can be found is under the hood, because the Sandero now utilises the same three-cylinder 900cc turbo-engine found in the new Clio. It’s an extremely smooth powerplant that proves that downsizing is the way of the future. Capable of offering a relatively sporty drive from its 66kW of power and 135Nm of torque, it can go from standstill to 100km/h in 11.1 seconds and reach a top speed of 175km/h.
Granted, it’s not going to beat any land speed records, but it will be a treat at the pumps, particularly with where the fuel price is headed. Renault claims a combined fuel consumption figure of 5.2 litres/100km and we know these figures are usually largely unattainable. However, at the launch we managed to muster up a very impressive 5.5 litres/100km while driving like a young Sebastian Vettel, making the claimed figure that much more impressive. The CO2 emissions rating is 119g/km.


After spending a decent amount of time behind the wheel, you begin to appreciate the new Sandero for what it is: a well-specced machine, built with cost and style in mind.


The drive may be slightly dull as you go through the motions sitting in traffic, but everything you need to keep you company is there.
From the Bluetooth functionality, MP3 radio with USB, air conditioning for those hot days to electric front and rear windows, the car is properly loaded - even boasting cruise control, which is unheard of in this segment. Space and practicality can’t be ignored either. Boot space is a best-in-class 292 litres while the large interior can fit four adult occupants.


Without sounding like a salesman, the Sandero isn’t lacking much, because wait, that’s not all. On the safety front it boasts ABS and EBD as well as EBA. Furthermore, ESP and hill start assist are fitted across the range, along with Isofix fasteners and driver and passenger airbags. In the higher Dynamique spec, consumers will also benefit from front side airbags.


Having jam-packed the Sandero full of the latest tech, Renault is clearly out to make a statement with this car, leaving the consumer wanting nothing extra. In such a hotly contested segment it seems like the French have done their homework, especially with such a good price proposition.


The only thing you may be found wanting is an automatic option as the five-speed manual box can get tedious to use in traffic and for the oil-burner lovers among us, perhaps a diesel derivative.


Ultimately it’s a user-friendly car, especially on the pocket of the cash-strapped consumer.


To find out the current Renault Sandero price visit approved Renault dealership such as Group 1 Renault. Group 1 Renault is a reputable Renault Western Cape dealership.

Article source: http://www.autodealer.co.za/new-cars/Renault/Sandero

Thursday, 26 May 2016

RENAULT Brand History

A business started by 3 brothers in France in 1899, has turned decades later into a very profitable business, considering that now Renault is the 4th largest automaker in the world thanks to its partnership with Nissan.

The brainchild of an enthusiastic engineer named Louis Renault, the company was created in association with his two brothers who ran the financial side while he took care of the “mechanics”. From the very beginning, Louis managed to show innovation when he invented and later patented a direct drive system on his De Dion-Bouton tricycle which he already turned into a four-wheel vehicle.

Louis also understood that it would be only through racing that he would make the Renault name known to the world so he entered his vehicles in city-to-city races where his brothers acted as drivers. A number of victories earned them the notoriety they were searching for. People watching the races made orders despite the fact the cars were expensive for the time.

The company quickly developed and set up shop by the Seine. The model line-up now had several models, including the first saloon in 1902. That was also the year that Louis designed his first engine, a four-cylinder, which gave out 24 HP.

In 1903, Marcel, one of the Renault brothers died in the Paris to Madrid race in a crash, a hard blow both for the company and for Louis who would now assign professional drivers to race for Renault. Instead, he focused on bringing Renault carts to more European markets and even over to the Americas.

As the gap between the United States and Europe widened because of the war and the economic crash, Renault sought to improve production and to lower costs. After the economic crisis, he wanted to become more autonomous and started buying all sorts of businesses that provided him with the materials and parts needed to make cars. He also modernized the factory, emulating Ford and his plant, introducing assembly plants in 1922.

During the economic crash of the 30s, all car manufacturers had to suffer and Renault was no exception. The company was forced to cut costs, reduce staff and become more efficient in production. That's why it started expanding into other areas, basically building anything with a motor attached to it. Busses, lorries, electric railcars, tractors and even airplane engines, all were now coming out of the Renault plant.

With worker strikes plaguing all of the country, Renault was nationalized by the government in 1945 in order to keep it from going bankrupt like Citroen had done some years before. The first project made by the new company was the small 4CV, but it was postponed until after WWII. For the European market, small cars were the future because they were cheap to buy and maintain.

The 4CV, introduced in 1946, proved to be a major success, much larger than initially expected. With the money the company made from sales, it bought and developed heavy machinery to help with production. Renault then turned again to the heavy goods sector and by merging two existing companies, Latil and Somua, they created a new company, completely dedicated to making trucks – Saviem.

As the 4CV aged, a new model was ready to surface, the Dauphine, which appeared in 1956. It too enjoyed great success, even in the US. In fact, it was so successful over the ocean that Renault had to set up a special transport company, CAT, to accommodate the high demand. Next, the Renault 4 and the Renault 8 took over where the Dauphine left off in 1961.

Renault started the 70s with another success, the sportier and more agile Renault 5, which owed its favorable welcome to its fuel efficiency during the oil crisis. But this didn't mean that the company was safe during these turbulent times. In a bid to retake the American market, Renault started assembling Rambler complete knock down kits and marketing them as Renault Ramblers.

Also during the 70s, Renault began expanding its influence and opened up plants in Eastern Europe, Africa and even Australia. The partnership with the American AMC company came in 1979. At the beginning of the 80s, Renault found itself in financial trouble again and the chairman of the company at the time decided to pull the company out of racing altogether, as well as selling all non-essential assets and cutting costs left and right.

The good news was that by 1987 the company began turning the balance in favor of profit, so that at the beginning of the 90s, a whole new line up was released on the market and all models proved successful: the new Clio, the new Espace, Twingo and the Laguna. The 1995 Renault Megane was the first car ever to achieve a four-star rating at the Euro NCAP safety tests.

Also during the 90s, Renault returned to Formula 1 racing and with success nonetheless, having won the Championship in 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997. In 1996 it was decided that a state-owned status of the company would not benefit in the long run so it was privatized again. Renault made further investments in Brazil, Argentina and Turkey.

After 2000, it launched a series of less successful vehicles like the Avantime and the Vel Satis, but also continued successfully with older series like the Clio, Laguna and Megane. Now the government owns 15,7% of the company, which has since bought Romanian car manufacturers Dacia and the South Korean Samsung not to mention 20% of Volvo (rumors have said that Renault was interesting in a total buy out).

Thursday, 21 April 2016

2016 Renault Sandero

Everything Renault launches of late seems to turn to gold. The new Clio is a great example and the recently launched Duster is even better. But the French brand has now turned its eyes to the entry-level market and replaced the Sandero with a completely new offering. And what an offering it is.
On the menu of this new French cuisine is a host of new upgrades and a lot of best-in-class features. Built on the same platform as the Clio, the Sandero hatch combines little ‘big car’ portions with the latest in engine technologies to offer the South African motoring public a product that is hard to ignore.
While the previous-generation Sandero may have had a few hiccups and a rather dull design, this new beauty regains some of the elegance the brand is renowned for.
Combining youthful and modern styling, it certainly looks the part in a segment that offers aging stock. But the Sandero’s centrepiece diamond-shaped badge gracing the front of the bonnet and dominating the black grille complements its fresh façade.The integrated roof spoiler and body coloured side mirrors along with the 15-inch alloy wheels (standard on the Dynamique) hint at a sporty undertone.
But probably where the biggest technological jump can be found is under the hood, because the Sandero now utilises the same three-cylinder 900cc turbo-engine found in the new Clio. It’s an extremely smooth powerplant that proves that downsizing is the way of the future. Capable of offering a relatively sporty drive from its 66kW of power and 135Nm of torque, it can go from standstill to 100km/h in 11.1 seconds and reach a top speed of 175km/h.
Granted, it’s not going to beat any land speed records, but it will be a treat at the pumps, particularly with where the fuel price is headed. Renault claims a combined fuel consumption figure of 5.2 litres/100km and we know these figures are usually largely unattainable. However, at the launch we managed to muster up a very impressive 5.5 litres/100km while driving like a young Sebastian Vettel, making the claimed figure that much more impressive. The CO2 emissions rating is 119g/km.
After spending a decent amount of time behind the wheel, you begin to appreciate the new Sandero for what it is: a well-specced machine, built with cost and style in mind.
The drive may be slightly dull as you go through the motions sitting in traffic, but everything you need to keep you company is there.
From the Bluetooth functionality, MP3 radio with USB, air conditioning for those hot days to electric front and rear windows, the car is properly loaded - even boasting cruise control, which is unheard of in this segment. Space and practicality can’t be ignored either. Boot space is a best-in-class 292 litres while the large interior can fit four adult occupants.
Without sounding like a salesman, the Sandero isn’t lacking much, because wait, that’s not all. On the safety front it boasts ABS and EBD as well as EBA. Furthermore, ESP and hill start assist are fitted across the range, along with Isofix fasteners and driver and passenger airbags. In the higher Dynamique spec, consumers will also benefit from front side airbags.
Having jam-packed the Sandero full of the latest tech, Renault is clearly out to make a statement with this car, leaving the consumer wanting nothing extra. In such a hotly contested segment it seems like the French have done their homework, especially with such a good price proposition.
The only thing you may be found wanting is an automatic option as the five-speed manual box can get tedious to use in traffic and for the oil-burner lovers among us, perhaps a diesel derivative.
Ultimately it’s a user-friendly car, especially on the pocket of the cash-strapped consumer. While it doesn’t ooze personality or an engaging drive, for the nine-to-five work week, it’s perfect.The new Sandero comes with Renault’s industry leading 5-year/150 000km warranty completed by a standard 2-year/30 000km service plan.
Thinking of owning your own Renault Sandero? If you are in South Africa - contact Group 1 Renault today.